Respecting the race: How 5 time finisher Kaci Lickteig approaches Western States

HOKA ONE ONE Athlete Kaci Lickteig is no stranger to The Western States ® 100-Mile Endurance Run. Having run the race every year since 2014 and won it in 2016, she now returns for her sixth race from Squaw Valley to Auburn. The course is everything she enjoys about trail running and the 2016 Western States Champion hasn’t lost any love for the race.

After a 10th place finish at UTMB last fall and a win at the 2019 Black Canyon 100K, she is looking forward to another opportunity to challenge herself. We sat down with Kaci to discover what drives her to compete year after year.

Photo credit: Chris Perlberg
Photo credit: Chris Perlberg

HOKA: What do you love about Western States?

Lickteig: That’s hard to answer because I love everything about it. I love the people whom I’ve come to know since my first experience in 2014. I love the community and atmosphere surrounding the race throughout the week leading up to the race. Everyone walking around seems so starry-eyed, excited, and grateful to be there. Seeing the veterans, the first-time runners, and all the legends that have made Western States what it is today. When you set foot on the Auburn track and hear your name being announced over the loudspeaker, that is the best feeling in the world, regardless of your placing. That is why I keep coming back.

HOKA: Your consistency in training volume and comeback after races on Strava is impressive; how do you do it?

Lickteig: The key is consistency. I’ve been running for about 16 years and the key to my health is being consistent and listening to my body. I know to keep 80% of my runs very easy and 20% at a higher effort, depending on my training cycle. I’ve also learned to take recovery days when needed and I never push myself out the door if I know I will not enjoy the run at all or if it risks injury. And I just love running! It is part of my life and I joke about being married to it!

HOKA: What motivates you the most to run through the harsh winter months?

Lickteig: I can’t see myself not running. It really is something I look forward to doing and when I miss a few days I feel like part of me is missing. I enjoy, as silly as that sounds, embracing the elements and getting out the door. I need fresh air, to feel my body move, and to get the rush of endorphins running through my body.

HOKA: What gives you confidence before big races?

Lickteig: What gives me confidence is feeling both physically and mentally fit. When my body feels strong and has no lingering niggles and I know I put in all the work possible I feel mentally ready to take on the race. I want to be at the start line knowing I did everything right in training to make me capable of being my best.

HOKA: 100 miles is a long way, what do you focus on while you’re out on the course?

Lickteig: What I focus on during a 100 miles is not focusing on 100 miles. I break the race up into aid station to aid station – that way, it doesn’t seem so overwhelming. I look forward to when I get to see my crew, the next section of trail that I will run, and then when I get to pick up my pacer. I like to focus on the scenery and embrace the moment that I am in. It makes the time fly by and soon enough the finish will be there.

HOKA: What lessons did you learn from your previous adventures at Western?

Lickteig: I’ve learned to respect the race, the distance, and the terrain. The quad punishment from the downhills made me suffer during my first experience. The next year I was more patient and had a better day. Then everything seemed to click in 2016 and I was able to have the best day ever. In 2017 I had too much emotion going into the race with my grandma fighting cancer, and when you have those kinds of feelings going into a big race it can lead to a massive blow up. Then in 2018, I had only 3-4 months worth of training for the race due to breaking my pelvis in October of 2017. So each year has given me a different experience and they have changed my life for the better.

HOKA: How will that knowledge affect the way you approach this year?

Lickteig: I will approach this year with the same respect and patience as I did in the past. I know how the course flows and what I need to do to make sure I run my own race. I am really looking forward to this year and what kind of day and story I will have from it.

Kaci

HOKA: You seem to have Western States dialed. What advice would you have for someone trying to complete their first Western States Endurance Run?

Lickteig: I would recommend staying patient early in the high country and not overloading your quads and legs too early. You want to be able to come into Foresthill able to run. Then once you get across the river and up to Green Gate you will want to keep moving forward because that section can feel very long if you have to walk. There are only a few big climbs left so this is where you can make up the time you saved back in the high country.

Once you hit No Hands Bridge, give it one last push up to Robie Point and know there is still a good climb up to the final mile sign…then it’s relatively all downhill from there! Follow those red footprints closely and make sure you don’t make a wrong turn as you head towards the Auburn Track, where your friends, fans, and buckle are waiting for your arrival!

HOKA: What model of HOKA will you be racing in?

Lickteig: My favorite HOKA for the trails is the Torrent. I love the fit and feel of this shoe. The Torrent is lightweight and has adequate traction for the trails. I have used these shoes in snow, mud, dirt, and rocks and they make me feel confident in their ability to grip the trail when I am running.

HOKA: What do you look forward to when it’s all over?

Lickteig: I look forward to sitting down, going back to the hotel for a nice shower and sleeping. Then waking up to go out and cheer on the people coming in at the Golden Hour, the last hour of the race. For me, knowing people are giving it their absolute all to get under 30 hours and seeing how hard they are still pushing is so inspiring to me. I love to help bring them in with encouraging words and if possible to trot beside them as they make their way to the track. That is probably one of my most favorite moments of the race.

After a solid block of training, Kaci is ready to toe the line. Follow the HOKA Instagram Story and Twitter for updates on Kaci’s 100-mile race this Saturday, June 29th.

Want to hit the trails like Kaci? Check out the HOKA Torrent.

Torrent

Life in a day

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Watch HOKA ONE ONE Athletes and professional ultramarathon runners Devon Yanko and Magda Boulet as they participate in the 2016 Western States® 100-Mile Endurance Race. Known as the world’s oldest 100-mile trail race, this course has 18,000 feet of elevation and starts in Squaw Valley, CA before ending on the track of Placer High School in Auburn, CA. Join these athletes as they experience the ups and downs of life in just a single day on the 100-mile course. Though both runners have raced this course before, they discover that there’s no guarantees in a ultra race.

Anything can happen in 100 miles

13055301_1152708681438285_7910317783512571146_n“A journey of 100 miles begins with a single step. I am honored to take the opportunity to race the Western States 100 Mile Endurance Run this year and race my heart out to defend my title. The world’s oldest and most prestigious 100-mile trail race started in Squaw Valley, CA and ends on the track at Placer HS in Auburn, CA. I am now less intimidated by the distance because I now have one 100-miler under my legs, but don’t be fooled, I hold a healthy level of fear because a 100-miler is still a 100-miler and anything can happen. With 9 weeks left, I am training my butt off and dreaming of flying through the canyons and entering the Placer HS track with a big smile on my face. Follow my journey to Western States.” – HOKA Athlete Magda Boulet 

How Vegetarian Sage Canaday Fuels for Miles

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HOKA ONE ONE runner Sage Canaday, 30, is no stranger to winning ultramarathons: He’s claimed victories at the Tarawera, in New Zealand, and The North Face Endurance Challenge, among other prestigious races. Now the Boulder, CO resident has his sights on this weekend’s Western States Endurance Run in northern California. “Western States is considered the most competitive 100-mile ultra-distance race in the U.S.,” Canaday says. “I want to compete against the best ultra-runners out there.”

While Canaday is known for speed and his ability to charge on climbs, he’s also a vegetarian, much like seven-time Western States winner (and running legend) Scott Jurek.

We caught up with Canaday to talk about his diet and fueling strategy, and how it helps him fly across the miles (and keep his skin clear!).

HOKA: How long have you been vegetarian? And why the move toward veganism?

Canaday: I really made a concerted effort to go mostly plant-based vegan after being ovo-lacto vegetarian [able to eat dairy and eggs] for the past 29 years. My girlfriend Sandi along with some scientific studies helped sway me. I’ve been about 98% vegan for the past eight months or so. A few times when we travel or go out to eat, I might try something with cheese or eggs in it, but when eating at home we don’t purchase those products anymore.

HOKA: Have you noticed any changes with your body since going mostly vegan?

Canaday: I don’t really notice a huge difference from being a vegetarian. I’m able to easily stay at the same weight I was in high school though, and I can eat as much as I want. I’ve always been a pretty lean guy, but it’s easier to keep a low body fat percentage. The biggest overnight change was that when I eliminated dairy, my acne cleared up!

HOKA: Have you noticed any changes with your running and training?

Canaday: I seem to be able to recover from high mileage—like running over 100 miles a week—and intense long runs, faster. I’ve also never had an overuse injury from running.

HOKA: How do you maintain your diet while traveling for races or other reasons?

Canaday: Traveling presents some challenges at times, depending on the location. We usually bring a lot of snacks. Fruit and veggies can usually be found at local stores and markets, so we try to stock up on those as well. Beans and rice are also staples in our diet, and they can be found in most places. A lot of times we’ll have to search for the top plant-based restaurant if we go out to eat though!

HOKA: Generally speaking, what are some key snacks you keep handy to maintain high energy?

Canaday: Fruit is always key. It hydrates, provides carbs (think quick, natural sugars), and is chock full of antioxidants and vitamins.

HOKA: What will be your pre-race breakfast at the Western States?

Canaday: I usually keep things simple in the morning: a banana on some pieces of sourdough, or whole-grain bread with a generous amount of almond butter. I drink quite a bit of plain coffee and water as well.

HOKA: Speaking of the race: Which shoes will you wear?

Canaday: I’m going to start of with the HOKA Speedgoats for the high alpine running and rocky trails, and then switch into the Claytons for the second half of the race. [Author’s note: The Western States course transitions from technical mountain terrain early in the race to more runnable, smooth trails in its latter stages.]